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All photos in & around York

Showing items 1 to 100 from total of 3,469 items. Ordered by photo # descending.

Photo # Icon Photo Caption Categorisation
186341Photo #186341[Image taken 27.9.22] Screwfix, James Street, York. [Note: No street view at this location.] Context: #186175, #186206. No space again for my cycle in the racks today. Two spaces used by staff cycles - no racks, no luggage, no attachments. A customer came out of the shop and rode off as I locked my cycle necessarily only to itself. During the time I was here with the manager another customer used the racks. How many more people could or would if the cycle parking were accessibly and comfortably spaced, and without the kerb for starters? Note also the motorcycle. There's a second one too - the other side of the cycle parking bay. Both belong to staff. There's no designated motorcycle parking. The manager said a surprising number of customers use this mode of transport. And you can use a motorcycle - perhaps a trike - as a mobility aid, just as you can a cycle. The one in view is on the pavement linking this entrance to Screwfix with the Electric Center (see: #186212). In the hour I was here, three or more people visited both outlets and necessarily had to use the newly created space between the chain and the cycle parking. If there had been a long cycle - perhaps with a trailer - they'd have had to walk in the disabled parking space. If that space had been in use, they'd have had to walk in the car park... On my three or four visits since Screwfix put in the chain and the notices I haven't seen anyone park here... Though there were repeated drivers who used the free space (as they saw it) in front of the entrance to the shop. Yet not one bought an item that could not be carried in just one hand. Other image today and links: #186340.Car storage:
Problem
carstorage
186340Photo #186340[Image taken 27.9.22] Screwfix, James Street, York. [Note: No street view at this location.] Context: #186175, #186206. Screwfix is coming out of this rather well. The fast response to my initial email, the keeping in contact with me and, as it seems, the genuinely pushing the landlord of their site here to take action, the proactive and very personable shop manager who talked with me for an hour in the dry but cold weather at this exact spot today, and the - it's so good to be able to pass on positive feedback - friendly staff in the shop who greet you and ask if they can help... These giant delivery vehicles are a huge problem - likely for everyone at any company that uses them as well as 'people' - the public - disadvantaged by them. Deliveries to this outlet in vehicles of this size block the disabled car parking, obstruct and obscure the entrance to the shop. Other image here today: #186341. Other image today and links: #186337.Other:
Problem
general
186339Photo #186339[Image taken 27.9.22] Explore York, Library Square, York. [NOTE: No streetview at this location] Context and links: #186337.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
186338Photo #186338[Image taken 27.9.22] Explore York, Library Square, York. Context and links: #186337.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
186337Photo #186337[Image taken 27.9.22] Explore York, Library Square, York. Ah, this is what the Sheffield stands here used to look like pre-covid… Full. And with a variety of designs – ‘York’ cycles I call them - used for transporting goods and people in addition to the rider. There was an York Energy Advice event - yorkenvironmentweek.org.uk/events-2022/save-energy-money/ Part of York Environment Week 2022 (yorkenvironmentweek.org.uk/events-2022/) Some of the stall holders will have cycled here. The students at the University of York are back too. Perhaps they are contributing to the full racks high numbers here and around town at the weekend (see: #186292) and this week. Alas, as is the norm now, there was a food collection driver using one of the two blue badge spaces provided for people with disabilities who are visiting the library. Other images here today: #186338, #186339. Other images today: #186340, #186341.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
186301Photo #186301[Image taken 25.9.22] Screwfix (Clifton Moor), Stirling Road, York. Other image this issue here today and links: #186300.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
186300Photo #186300[UPDATE: Reply from Screwfix 28.9.22 "the Property team...have advised that the area shown in the images you have kindly provided is within our demise. The potholes have already been reported by the Store to the Maintenance Team and they have then been reported for repair, the maintenance team are just awaiting further confirmation as work is arranged externally and are chasing this."] [Image taken 25.9.22] Screwfix (Clifton Moor), Stirling Road, York. Other image this issue here today and links: #186301. My bidon is around 7cm wide which means this pothole is around that deep. More than enough to unseat someone and damage their cycle. Other image this site today and links: #186295.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
186299Photo #186299[Image taken 25.9.22] Screwfix (Clifton Moor), Stirling Road, York. [NOTE: No streetview at this location] How do you get a cycle into these spaces? The access between the supports and the hedge is just 74cm, there’s very little room to manoeuvre a cycle – you’d need to vertically lift is which many can’t do. Clearly some people use them for something – staff? - as the presence of at least three locks left on the bars shows. Other image here today and links: #186295.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
186298Photo #186298[Image taken 25.9.22] Screwfix (Clifton Moor), Stirling Road, York. The supports are not long enough… you wheel a cycle into cycle parking (or reverse it) and you need space in front of or behind the wheel. If you don’t have an integral stand or aren’t using it/use it in combination with the cycle parking support you need space in front of it and behind. There is no provision with this design for people to wheel their cycles sufficiently far forward that the rig can lean on the support without becoming unstable as here. My cycle now takes up all the space in the gap between the two supports – intended for two cycles – and is unstable. I was not able to support my cycle or load it. Imagine if you had a child seat on your cycle and also an infant in the seat… Further there is just 63cm between the supports – the recommended minimum is 100cm, many local authorities now set the minimum distance as 120cm. The ends of the racks are unusable – 37cm? 40cm? The Sustrans traffic-free routes and greenways design guide (www.sustrans.org.uk/for-professionals/infrastructure/sustrans-traffic-free-routes-and-greenways-design-guide/) says: “the typical dimensions of a conventional bike are 1.8m long and 0.65m wide” (www.sustrans.org.uk/for-professionals/infrastructure/sustrans-traffic-free-routes-and-greenways-design-guide/sustrans-traffic-free-routes-and-greenways-design-guide-contents/2019-design-guidance/part-2-design-details/6-space-requirements/) You’ve also got to be able to wheel it into a space, lock/unlock it and unload/load it. Further the maximum length of something that will fit in these spaces is 175cm. The graphic 6.1.3 shows the widths and lengths of a range of cycles. With just 175cm available, not one will fit in these racks (and the other side is even tighter - 160cm (see: #186298) - even without the problem of the kerb/step/bump up/down and discounting the presence of motor vehicles parked immediately in front or to the side of the cycle parking provision. Other image here today and links: #186295.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
186297Photo #186297[Image taken 25.9.22] Screwfix (Clifton Moor), Stirling Road, York. [NOTE: No streetview at this location] The racks in relation to the entrance to the retail outlet. They look straightforward to find, and practical to use. If only... Other image here today and links: #186295.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
186296Photo #186296[Image taken 25.9.22] Screwfix (Clifton Moor), Stirling Road, York. [NOTE: No streetview at this location] Context and links: #186295.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
186295Photo #186295[Image taken 25.9.22] Screwfix (Clifton Moor), Stirling Road, York. [NOTE: No streetview at this location] Why does someone put cycle parking behind car parking? Why is it not picked up by planners that if there is motor vehicle parking in front of cycle parking the former blocks access to/from the latter? See also: #186175, #182295? The racks at this retail outlet are covered. They are flat topped and should offer good support for a variety of designs of cycle and having two bars should offer myriad locking places. They are close to the entrance, but… There’s a ‘path’ to the cycle parking but it’s narrow – too narrow to wheel a cycle through if the vehicle parking spaces are in use. Oh, yes, the cycle parking is either hemmed in by vehicle parking spaces (see: #186296) or hedges. Further, even when the vehicle parking spaces around the structure are empty the drop kerb is only usable by people parking a cycle immediately in front of it. Other images with other problems with this cycle parking here today: #186297, #186298, #186299, #186300, #186301. Other images today: #186293, #186294.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
186294Photo #186294[Image taken 25.9.22] Wickes, Lysander Close, Clifton Moor, York. [NOTE: No streetview at this location] Five cycles using the racks at this DIY outlet today. The bollards protect: the cycles, the people on them, and the large manoeuvring space in which they are parked. This is good practice. I would still like to see a large ‘Cycle parking’ sign set sufficiently high up you can see it as you enter the car park and from all areas within it. Other images today: #186295, #186296, #186297, #186298, #186299, #186300, #186301.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
186293Photo #186293[Image taken 25.9.22] Wigginton Road, York. This sign has an exploded sandbag beneath it. The bag is not doing its job – holding the sign in situ. It is creating a skid hazard. Disappointing, after the one opposite was cleared up: #186086.Other:
Problem
general
186292Photo #186292[Image taken 24.9.22] St Andrewgate, York. A stashed or abandoned sign, and a sandbag. Signs left like this can become hazards or be used as tools to destroy property or as weapons. Sandbags can explode (see: #186293). The grit released is not just an eyesore but also a hazard… wheels skid on it. Today, the racks were full here (and at the other locations I saw as I moved around the city centre). When I returned to my cycle there was a distressed couple of adults - they had left panniers (bike bags) on one of their cycles and they'd been stolen. People (including me) often leave removable luggage on cycles. And who would challenge someone taking it off and walking away with it? Note the trailer. It is too long for the width of the pavement. It is therefore a trip hazard for someone with little or no sight and vulnerable to vehicle movements for example emergency vehicles or when the footstreets open to motor traffic towards the end of the day.Other:
Problem
general
186260Photo #186260[Image taken 22.9.22] Next to Bella Italia, Clifton Moor Gate, York. In most existing guides, the minimum recommended space between supports is 100cm. CYC is now recommending 120cm – this accommodates more shapes of people, panniers, lifting a child on/off, loading a cycle (which you do from the side). However, it can still be tight of there are two cycles with panniers, etc. The racks are spaced unevenly. This means (intentionally or otherwise) that people can choose their space responsibly ie not using a wider gap if they don’t need it. It would have to be a very slimmed down machine to use the end space that is just 44cm wide. Plus, you’d need agility and likely long arms – the cycle parking roof structure limits access as does the fence post. I haven’t seen one of the plastic structures attached to the trailer bike, for several years. Rule 163 of the Highway Code republished in 2022 (www.gov.uk/guidance/the-highway-code/using-the-road-159-to-203) says: “[As a guide:] leave at least 1.5 metres when overtaking cyclists at speeds of up to 30mph, and give them more space when overtaking at higher speeds”. This still seems close when the road has a noisy surface, the vehicle is large and moving fast, and there are parts that protrude and therefore intrude into the ‘envelope’ around the cyclists envelope. But crikey, how did we ever consider a piece of plastic this short to be safe and sufficient – even with the reflector? Other images here today: #186258, #186259.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
186259Photo #186259[Image taken 22.9.22] Next to Bella Italia, Clifton Moor Gate, York. Other images here today: #186258, #186260. Approaching from off-road segregated cycle route alongside Clifton Moor Gate, the cycle parking is easy to find. It’s also easy to reach – it’s level access. The tarmac labelling makes it clear what it is and where it is. The provision and labelling predates Instagram, drones… I’ve always been curious as to the reason for it. But now I appreciate the fact there can be no confusion over what this structure is for (compare with: #182714). Perhaps the geographical information would help when reporting the theft of a cycle, for example. If the cover on the structure were wider, the child seat (or a trailer, etc) would be more likely to remain dry. If the Sheffield stands (the upright supports) were further forward, the entire rig would be further forward. But there also cycles that are long in front (see: #166718). So, it’s the roof that needs to be wider. The adult cycle has a single-prong stand but it seems also to be supported by the Sheffield rack, to which it is also secured. It is what I call a ‘York’ cycle – it has a basket and a rack in addition to the child-towing attachment. In short it is a cycle set up for utility and family use. Other images here today: #186258, #186260.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
186258Photo #186258[Image taken 22.9.22] Next to Bella Italia, Clifton Moor Gate, York. A rainy evening and I saw the covered cycle parking had a longer rig projecting from it. It was a Tagalong-style cycle trailer: a child size wheel ‘half’ cycle that attaches to the adult’s machine. The child pedals and contributes to the forward motion of the combined rig. The child gets exercise and keeps warm, the adult gets some assistance. The adult knows where the child is at all times. Some attachments can be unstable, though – they can lean quite disconcertingly far over – at least it looks this way it you are watching. A wet saddle, wet and therefore cold hands put people off cycling. And if a child is unenthusiastic the adult might decide that they make the journey by car instead. The roof is a positive as is the fact there is level access, lots of room to get even a longer unwieldy cycle in and out. Further, there is room for pedestrians and other users of the space to not be at risk, easy overview of the movements of other people for the cycle parking users, and the area is motor vehicle-free. This protects the cycles and the users from possibly damage or injury. If there are vehicles bollards can provide protection for the cyclists and their cycles: #184753. Other images here today: #186259, #186260.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
186237Photo #186237[Image taken 18.9.22] Hungate, Pound Lane, York. [NOTE: No streetview at this location] An exciting sight that made this area of the city look like somewhere in Denmark, Germany or the Netherlands ie where cargo cycles are commonplace. But why is it here? Because the owners are visiting - and there's no safe place they can quickly stow it? Because the owners are nipping back home for a short while - and there's no quick way to get to the garaging to stow it? It doesn't need a support - it has a two-pronged stand. It's likely locked... but if it is, it will only be to itself. I think it is vulnerable. A few years ago, I took a tour of the onsite cycle parking with the representative of the site. And followed up with an email. Short-stay securing options are needed for the above scenarios and for people delivering items or meals or collecting by cycle. But, there's another issue... This cycle is 'tidied' between two planters. But if someone who was blind happened upon such an item that was flyparked and not protected, what then?Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
186223Photo #186223Why cyclists don't use cycle lanes no.1,432,807Obstruction:
Problem
obstructions
186212Photo #186212[Image taken 17.9.22] Screwfix, James Street, York. [Note: No street view at this location.] The site looking west, and east: #186211. Other images here today and links #186206.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
186211Photo #186211[Image taken 17.9.22] Screwfix, James Street, York. [Note: No street view at this location.] The layout of the site looking east, and west: #186212. Other images here today and links #186206.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
186210Photo #186210[Image taken 17.9.22] Screwfix, James Street, York. [Note: No street view at this location.] Both the cycles in the shelter belong to staff. There is no room for customers' cycles. Not only are the supports to close together but there is just 15cm between the uprights and the shelter sides. That's a loss of two spaces that can often be used by larger designs of cycles including those used for cycles for carrying people or goods, by people with mobility issues: #185679, #183747. The new space created by the addition of poles and a chain. Discussion of the amount of space - 80cm plus 1m: #186209. Other images here today and links #186206.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
186209Photo #186209[Image taken 17.9.22] Screwfix, James Street, York. [Note: No street view at this location.] The spaces between the supports are just 68cm wide. My cycle - without me next to it and without me pulling it towards me to be able to load up is 70cm. I was not able to use the cycle parking. This means my cycle is only locked to itself. It is vulnerable to theft. Many insurance companies won't insure cycles that are not secured to an immovable object. Further, there is 80cm between the back wheel of the cycles and the 'kerb'/front of the disabled car parking space. This is insufficient to easily manoeuvre a cycle out even for fit people with light cycles that are unloaded, if the car parking space is in use: #186175. A further 1m of space has been created (see: #186206). 180cm is sufficient for manoeuvring standard cycles but not for a trailer... see: #186150. And, if you are shopping and it is at a DIY/building's merchants you might well have a trailer. But that drop kerb has to go and the disabled parking bays be moved backwards and permanently protected. Other images here today and links #186206.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
186208Photo #186208[Image taken 17.9.22] Screwfix, James Street, York. [Note: No street view at this location.] The driver of the vehicle completely obstructing the entrance to the shop came in while I was in there. He was still in there while I was loading up. He was still there after I'd unlocked my bike. He was still in there when I retreated to behind the perimeter fence to take this image. All the while the engine was running. There was an adult in the passenger seat and at least one child in the back. I could not escape the stench and therefore the effects of the fumes until I was away from the site. Other images here today and links #186206.Enforcement:
Problem
enforcement
186207Photo #186207[Image taken 17.9.22] Screwfix, James Street, York. [Note: No street view at this location.] In the around 10 minutes I was here today, this driver obstructed the entrance... as did this one: #186208. Such entitlement, such selfishness, is breathtaking and hugely worrying. Other images here today and links #186206.Road environment:
Problem
road
186206Photo #186206[More recent images - new problems but a positive meeting: #186340, #186341.] [Image taken 17.9.22] Screwfix, James Street, York. [Note: No street view at this location.] Returning two days after I emailed the CEO of Screwfix: action. The designated and marked - in bright yellow paint with the recognised disabled symbol - disabled parking today had poles, a chain and (flimsy perhaps temporary) signs stating: Please be aware this bay is for disabled parking only. The route around the car park behind these spaces and in front of the ones against the back fence is sufficient for drivers to move around on yet leave room for disabled customers to park on the remainder of the designated spaces. It is very disappointing some drivers put their needs above those of others and that the (standard) disabled symbol is not enough. I saw someone drive into the site and up to this location... and then move to another space. Perhaps he had been here before and used the disabled parking. I have returned to this caption to add to it... How - and who - can get across the message to everyone who installs cycle parking and those who design the spaces it needs to go in, and those who commission it that disabled people who cycle need cycle parking too. This is lack of understanding stymies me getting organisations to make changes to the design or spacing of provision: #183407, or its location - including up a step, as here. Context: a) practicality of the cycle parking: #186157 and b) obstruction and hemming in by drivers: #186175. Other images here today: #186207, #186208, #186209, #186210, #186211, #186212.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
186192Photo #186192[Image taken 15.9.22] NCN65, Butcher Terrace behind, Terry Avenue ahead left, the Millennium Bridge ahead, York. [Note: No street view at this location.] The darker tarmac shows the route given up to motor traffic during Clementhorpe floodworks. The road was removed and the non-motorised user route reinstated but not alas widened. Context and links: #186187.Cycleway:
Infrastructure
cycleways
186191Photo #186191[Image taken 15.9.22] Butcher Terrace end of the Millennium Bridge, Terry Avenue right, York. [Note: No street view at this location.] Companion speed humps for non-motorised users to: #186190. Context and links: #186187.Cycleway:
Problem
cycleways
186190Photo #186190[Image taken 15.9.22] NCN65, Butcher Terrace to the left, Terry Avenue ahead, the Millennium Bridge to the right, York. [Note: No street view at this location.] Speed humps for non-motorised users. Can be physically painful for some people and hard work for others. The route ahead is open again. Context and links: #186187.Cycleway:
Problem
cycleways
186189Photo #186189[Image taken 15.9.22] Millennium Bridge behind me, looking towards Butcher Terrace, York. [Note: No street view at this location.] The image shows the route that this sign: #185661 and this one #185668 - discussion: #185186 – tell cyclists to take. It is the most congested, you have to traverse humps (see: #186190 and #186191), there is every type and age and fitness of non-motorised user going uphill towards the Millennium Bridge and downhill from it. The signs need to be removed until they can be replaced with signage that directs people going straight ahead, on cycles and hire e-scooters. Staying on the path next to the river means people stay on the flat and out of the way of everyone heading to/from the Millennium Bridge. Other image here today and links: #186187.Cycleway:
Infrastructure
cycleways
186188Photo #186188[Image taken 15.9.22] Millennium Bridge behind me, looking towards Butcher Terrace, York. [Note: No street view at this location.] Route on the right is open again. Context: #185183. Grass seeds have been applied to the bare earth ahead left. The speed humps collect water. The previous CYC active travel officer said the Environment Agency would be asked to sort the drainage as part of their Clementhorpe Floodworks undertaking. Note the very clear desire line on the right that avoids the humps. Other image here today and links: #186187.Cycleway:
Problem
cycleways
186187Photo #186187[Image taken 15.9.22] Butcher Terrace looking towards the Millennium Bridge, York. The route on the left towards the riverside/Terry Avenue is open again. Context: #185183. CYC has missed a chance to bring the shared use path on the left up to at least minimum standards - I don't think it is the required 3m. Other images here today: #186188, #186189, #186190, #186191, #186192. Other image today and links: #186185.Cycleway:
Infrastructure
cycleways
186186Photo #186186[Image taken 15.9.22] Biba House, 16 St Saviour's Place, York YO1 7PJ. Context and links: #186185.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
186185Photo #186185[Image taken 15.9.22] Biba House, 16 St Saviour's Place, York YO1 7PJ. The entrance to the car- and cycle-parking for this residential development is on Aldwark. This means the cycle parking is visible to a great many people. Which must make it vulnerable. And what do people see? Wheelbenders. And the usual problem… If you can only attach a wheel to an immovable object, you lose the cycle. If you attach the cycle but do not secure the wheels, you lose the latter. It is curious that there is a wheel without a cycle and a cycle without a wheel. Perhaps there is another explanation. In 2021, I did try to find a contact for the development owners to ask if I could discuss the cycle parking with them. It came to nothing. I’ll try again now it looks as if a resident's or two residents' cycles have been vandalised. Location of this property and parking: #186186. Other images today: #186187, #186188, #186189, #186190, #186191, #186192.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
186178Photo #186178[Image taken 15.9.22] Foss Islands Path, bridge over Huntington Road, York. [NOTE: No streetview at this location.] For as long as I can remember riding over the metal plate causes a very loud bang. The unexpected noise is at odds with the calm and quiet route and contrary to the reason many of us cycle – to not impact on the environment or cause nuisance or harm to others. The expansion gap is a very possible hazard akin to the gap here: #186177. Other image here today (and link): #186176.Cycleway:
Problem
cycleways
186177Photo #186177[Image taken 15.9.22] Foss Islands Path, bridge over Huntington Road, York. [NOTE: No streetview at this location.] There is now a visible ‘step’ in the height of the concrete. Either this defect or the one in #186176 has caused me to nearly lose control of my steering or a front pannier to jump off. The gap between the two sections of concrete is wide enough to 'hold' or catch a wheel and cause someone to come off.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
186176Photo #186176[Image taken 15.9.22] Foss Islands Path, bridge over Huntington Road, York. [NOTE: No streetview at this location.] The Foss Islands Path is very popular with the full range of non-motorised user. Justifiably. It links places people live, shop, want to go, etc. It's part of the York Orbital route (yorkshireridings.blogspot.com/p/york-orbital.html). It’s direct and lit. But it does need work at this bridge over Huntington Road. Either at the depression in this image or here: #186177, I have several times nearly lost control of my handlebars when I hit the edge of the concrete; and at the other location one of my front panniers jumps off. Other problem at this location today: #186178. I will send these links to CYC and Sustrans. Other image today: #186175.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
186175Photo #186175[UPDATE: See #186206] [Image taken 15.9.22] Screwfix, James Street. York. [NOTE: No streetview at this location.] Boxed in by the drivers of: the dark vehicle on the far side of the cycle shelter (is that even intended for people to park on?) and the blue van in the disabled space in front. Other image this subject here: #186157. Other images today: #186176, #186177, #186178.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
186160Photo #186160[Image taken 14.9.22] Bootham, York. An American with Swedish heritage whose husband works in Aberdeen and Cambridge. They visit York often. Her cycle? One of the Bromptons the hotel lends guests. We love the hotel, she said. Which hotel? No 1 Guesthouse, York: #179570. If you are the person in this pic - thanks for stopping to talk to me. The link to the page with the cycle route map of York is: www.york.gov.uk/downloads/file/1163/annex-1-york-cycle-map-2017. There are suggestions for leisure cycle routes in York here: www.itravelyork.info/downloads/download/12/leisure-rides There are videos made on some of the city's routes here: www.itravelyork.info/cycle-routes The link to the York Cycle Campaign is: yorkcyclecampaign.bike/ The link to the Cambridge Cycle Campaign is: www.camcycle.org.uk/ I hope you enjoy the rest of your stay - and subsequent visits to this city. Other images today and links: #186158.Bicycle:
Good practice
bicycles
186159Photo #186159[Image taken 14.9.22] Lidl, James Street, York. [Note: No street view at this location.] As I cycled into the car park, I saw the rider of this folder head for the EV charging bays. I followed him. He explained you can use the bays for a maximum of two hours. So what do you do while you wait? On a dry, sunny day you take your folding cycle and go for a leisure ride. Other images today and links: #186158.Bicycle:
Good practice
bicycles
186158Photo #186158[Image taken 14.9.22] Bootham, York. Context: #186050, #186051, #186052, (extended caption) #186053, #186054, #186054. This junction is part of the Scarborough Bridge to Bootham Park cycle route improvements scheme (see: #172109) and the proposed A19 Cycle Scheme (links: #172109). I stopped today during the rush hour to take an image of one of the several issues. The light (note singular) here and the other side of the hatched box (a set of two) seem to be triggered by all of: road users in Marygate waiting to turn into Bootham – presumably this will include cyclists wanting to go straight ahead ie on the route to the hospital; pedestrians using the button shown in this image; and will be activated by peoples on cycles coming out of the grounds of the former Bootham Park Hospital who will have a button of their own. But even without the latter, the hatched area fills up with all forms of traffic. (On each phase while I watched the entire hatched space was choked with motor vehicles.) Cyclists coming out of the former hospital grounds - the reason for this junction - took their chances and filtered through or, did as this visitor did: #86160 got off and pushed along the pavement to the crossing. Not the aim of the design or justification for the money it cost. The crossing phase I used after taking this image not a line of motor vehicles before the lights like this white car and the line behind it, but also three people on cycles. However there is no stop line for any road user here and no lights on this side. It seems to me every part of the junction is now both unclear and hazardous for every user: pedestrian, cyclist and motorist. Yet the aim is to make cycling for attractive and efficient. Other images today and links: #186157.Road environment:
Problem
road
186157Photo #186157[More recent image here: #186206.] [Image taken 14.9.22] Screwfix, James Street, York. [Note: No street view at this location.] Positives: 1. There is cycle parking. 2. The cycle parking is covered. 3. The cycle parking is very close to the entrance to the shop so it's: a) easy to find; b) easy to take your items back to your cycle. 4. The racks are Sheffields. Negatives - all avoidable. 1. There are just three uprights. 2. These uprights are intended to be supports and the "immovable object" to secure your cycle to... a condition many insurance companies set for a cycle to be covered. However they are: a) too close together so they are difficult and uncomfortable to use if you have luggage, are buying items (this is what you are here for, surely), have mobility issues, have a wider cycle, want to lockshare... b) too close to the shelter sides - there's no room on the outside of the upright closest to the camera, for example. This means instead of the three uprights accommodating six (minimum) cycles there is only space for three rigs. And the green one is not secured/was blocking my exit. 3. There is no room for a trailer or longer rig: compare with this newer storage at B&Q (the same company that owns Screwfix): #184753. 4. There is a step up (a kerb) and therefore down which makes access difficult or perhaps impossible for some people. And, once again, you are here to buy stuff so you might be heavily laden... Second image, different problem here: #186175. Other images today: #186158, #186159, #186160.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
186151Photo #186151[Image taken 12.9.22] Library Square, York. It had started to rain. Hard. The padding on this child seat was sodden. The rest of the seat was wet too. A reason for installing covered cycle parking wherever possible. This is particularly important at locations popular with families - such as here, the library/reading cafe. Note the plastic bag (orange) over the saddle of the cycle one along. It’s easier to carry a small bag than a large one or bespoke protection – see child seats with covers: #186049, #186026. Other image today and links: #186149.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
186150Photo #186150[Image taken 12.9.22] Aldi, Water Lane, York. The trailer is a minimum of 84cm wide. And that's when it is not moving. In use it will require more space. And a great deal more when turning. Context and link: #186149. As I was taking the measurements and taking photos someone I assume to be the manager came out. I explained the bars on which the cycle with the trailer is secured is ‘good practice’. I explained about people needing to leave luggage unattended first while they went in search of a trolley – round the other side of the shop, as far away almost as it’s possible for them to be from the cycle parking. I explained about needing to do the same after you’ve done your shop when you now leave your original items unattended, plus the products you have joust bought. And asked, And what if you have a child/children onboard? I explained what cyclists need is a trolley park next to the racks. He said he’d try passing it up the chain but added, “It depends on you getting the right person”. I said some people with mobility issues use trolleys as a support. Plus as it is family parking in front of the racks, children could be put into the trolley here instead of being carried round the corner. As I was picking up my (light, thankfully) panniers to carry them to the trolley park, a customer simply pushed her trolley towards the cycle parking. She had loaded her child into her car and the baby had started to cry… So, if there were a trolley bay here it would work for many customers, including the most vulnerable, not ‘just’ people on cycles.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
186149Photo #186149[Image taken 12.9.22] Aldi, Water Lane, York. I (still) don't know if the two Sheffields at right angles to the run of racks are/were intended to be used for cycle parking but they work for longer rigs. The cycle plus trailer is 280cm long. If it were parked on the Sheffield to which my cycle is secured, it would have been too long for the available space and perhaps protruded into the car parking area, and obstructed the walkway. (Layout of Aldi cycle parking and position of car parking: #181649.) Other image with the width of the trailer: #186150. Other image today: #186151.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
186101Photo #186101[UPDATE: On 21.9.22 an email from CYC said: "They will not be removed as they are needed to prevent unauthorised vehicle access to the pedestrian/cycle route."] [Image taken 10.9.22] Terry Avenue (Millennium Bridge/Butcher Terrace end), York. [Note: No street view at this location.] Earlier image of a trailer passing through these bollards in the other direction: #185664. There are no reflectors on these pieces of solid and unforgiving infra. Other image this route here today and links: #186099.Other:
Problem
general
186100Photo #186100[Image taken 10.9.22] Terry Avenue (Millennium Bridge/Butcher Terrace end), York. [Note: No street view at this location.] The shared use route is not yet fully open. Context and links: #186099.Obstruction:
Event
obstructions
186099Photo #186099[Image taken 10.9.22] Terry Avenue (Millennium Bridge/Butcher Terrace end), York. [Note: No street view at this location.] The route is slowly reopening after the Clementhorpe flood works (context and links: #164634). But why has CYC not taken the opportunity to make these two stretches wider? The minimum recommended width in LTN 1/20 is 3m for shared use routes. Plus why have these signs not been removed: #185668, #185661 to reduce congestion at the point the bridge meets the righthand track? And why did these #186101 get put in? Other image this route here today: #186100. Other image today and links: #186098.Track:
Problem
track
186098Photo #186098[Image taken 10.9.22] Deangate, York. Four Tier hire cycles all but fill the onstreet public racks. Overview Tiers: #164663. Other images today: #186099, #186100, #186101.Bike share:
Event
bikeshare
186087Photo #186087[Image taken 8.9.22] Wigginton Road, York. Context and links: #186084. The pavement is unusable due to the combination of surface water on a path obstructed by uncut foliage and a cone.Other:
Problem
general
186086Photo #186086[UPDATE: First the sign, then the sand disappeared. I hope the latter was cleared up by humans rather than dispersed by wind, rain and/or the movement of people over it. But another instance has appeared on the opposite corner: #186293.] Image taken 8.9.22] Wigginton Road, York. Context and links: #186084. This sandbag has been left in situ despite: it no longer doing the job it was presumably placed here to do - stabilise the A-board; it adding a hazard - a slippery surface to a key cycling, wheelchairing and walking route; it now being a source of sand/grit now being dispersed via foot and cycle traffic, and wet and windy weather to create a hazard over a wider area. Someone - Latimer? - must have responsibility for checking signs/the edges of the site...Track:
Problem
track
186085Photo #186085[Image taken 8.9.22] Wigginton Road, York. Large - very long - vehicles come in and out of here. They can take some time to be able to exit onto Wigginton Road. While they wait they obstruct the dropped kerbs. The ones that turn in do so fast and the drivers seeming unaware they are crossing a route used by people of all ages, all levels of cognitive and physical ability. They don't always have their indicators going. Context and links: #186084.Road environment:
Problem
road
186084Photo #186084[UPDATE: The Latimer Community Liasion Manager for the North replied: "Rest assured I will contact Henry Boot and Mcanns Construction, I will endeavour to get these issues resolved asap. I will liaise with contractors regarding access and egress from site and see what traffic management is in place, as well as cleaning schedule, whilst the weather does play a factor it seems a little too unkempt for my liking. Thank you for bringing this to my attention." [Image taken 8.9.22] Wigginton Road, York. The mud, sand and water was unavoidable for people cycling, scooting, walking, wheelchairing on this critical route. It links schools, jobs, shopping, residential areas, leisure options… I’ll try complaining to Latimer. Surface water stains clothes. Grit wears chains, rims, and brakes. Pupils might get told off for getting school kit mucky when it wasn’t their fault. Anyone who gets any of this mix on their clothes will be unhappy. It all makes active travel less attractive – much less care-free and rather more expensive. Other images this problem today: #186085, #186086, #186087. Photo of issues here in Jan 2022: #178041.Road environment:
Problem
road
186055Photo #186055[Image taken 8.9.22] Bootham, York. The pedestrian crossing over Bootham has been retained. The hatching is part of a cycle-specific crossing: #186051, #186052. Though I think people on foot exiting the route from the former Bootham Park Hospital might not walk the couple of metres to this pedestrian crossing but cross when lights go green for cyclists. There is no stop light and no stop line here – presumably cyclists, motorists are not intended to be in the boxed area/the gap between the first lights (see: #186050) and these. But we often are. It feels like a dog’s dinner. I hope I’m wrong – I’m not a traffic engineer. But the aim is to facilitate safe journeys and encourage takeup of active travel for the short distance between the hospital and the station. However, the changes as they stand have created congestion (and tangible air pollution), uncertainty and hazards for all users – motorised and not. Other image here today and links: #186050. Other image today and links: #186045.Road environment:
Infrastructure
road
186054Photo #186054[Image taken 8.9.22] Bootham, York. Two clear stop lights and a new and capacious ASL. This is a pedestrian crossing and… the eastern end (looking west towards Clifton Green) of the extended junction that is part of the Scarborough Bridge to Bootham Park cycle route improvements scheme. The ASL lead-in lane is wider than the original meets-no-standards advisory markings. See the repainted lines with cycle logos continuing through the junction. (The lanes that remain closer to Bootham Bar are much faded.) See second set of new clear markings, another ASL and lights at the other end but no pedestrian crossing: #186050. Compare with the unclear layout here: #186053. Other image today in another part of York and links: #186045.Road environment:
Infrastructure
road
186053Photo #186053[Image taken 8.9.22] Bootham, York. Context and links: #186050. This driver had turned right out of St Mary’s. S/he stopped at the red light. But there is only one for people in this direction here. So perhaps anyone coming out of that road does not need to do so? But if someone is crossing? St Mary’s is a short road so perhaps there won’t be many motor vehicles making this turn and they will all come to know it. But people on cycles may come up from St Mary’s and turn right… and they may not be local/regular users. I have got this far cycling along Bootham in the direction of Bootham Bar having crossed the first light of this junction on green (see: #186050) and had to suddenly stop as the lights have changed immediately in response to a pedestrian pressing the button. There is not enough time to clear the space between the lights (one on the far side of the lanes, here and one on this carriageway before the start of the hatched area). I took an image of motorists who have been caught here too: #186158. It’s a frequent/likely occurrence – for road users. It puts pedestrians at risk. And how will this work for cyclists crossing on their green: #186051, #186052. Surely they will find their route obstructed or that another road user approaches from the left when the cyclist using these lights has a green to go. S/he will likely need to launch him/herself from a standstill to be able to clear the crossing – including the cobbles – before the lights change. I am worried about this new piece of infra. If it doesn’t work now with none of the users for whom it has been designed and installed using it, then how will this change when it goes live for cyclists using the Scarborough Bridge to Bootham Park cycle route improvements scheme? There are already problems further west… At busy times – several times a day/if the lights are out/if there is any other issue, the road traffic displaced – kept out of the boxed junction here - by this scheme, added to the increase in motor vehicles, means people on cycles from Bootham Crescent joining Bootham eastbound, no longer have clear carriageway to their left. If you want to turn right (Bootham Terrace) to head for the rail station/river, etc, ie parallel to the improvements scheme now have to sit in the motor traffic and the air pollution and crawl along as part of it. This is also the case for people on cycles coming along Bootham from Clifton. Bootham is supposed to be getting an A19 Cycle Scheme (links: #172109) along its length. I think most people on cycles heading for the station will want to turn right into Bootham Terrace not use the cycle lane to the new crossing and turn right there… I also can’t see how people on cycles on Bootham are going to make the right turn at the new junction. There’s no turning pocket or other assistance… How will they trigger the lights to be able to do so... Second image this pedestrian crossing today: #186055. Image these junction marking in other direction: #186054. Other image today in another part of York and links: #186045.Road environment:
Problem
road
186052Photo #186052[Image taken 8.9.22] Bootham, York. Context and links: #186051. Looking ahead to St Mary’s – the continuation of the Scarborough Bridge to Bootham Park cycle route in the direction of the rail station. The cycle specific lights are not yet in operation. I hope they have a long crossing phase - getting over the junction from a standstill will take time on heavier cycles. And the cobbles will add a hazard, create an additional barrier and slow people down.Road environment:
Infrastructure
road
186051Photo #186051[Image taken 8.9.22] Bootham, York. Context and links: #186050. The planned exit from the former Bootham Park Hospital – see also: #186052. Note the cobbles. The cyclist’s eye view of the junction looking east (towards Bootham Bar). The cyclist-specific lights are not yet in operation. Pedestrians have their own crossing: #186055.Road environment:
Infrastructure
road
186050Photo #186050NOTE: Later image of this junction that illustrates the seeming problem of timings and design that seem to put crossing users: cyclist and pedestrians, but also road users, at risk: #186158. [Image taken 8.9.22] Bootham, York. Part of the Scarborough Bridge to Bootham Park cycle route improvements scheme – see: #177537. Note the number in this direction - two BUT - and the position... One here on this side. One on the other side of the carriageway on the other side (pedestrian) crossing. The crossing for cyclists is not yet in operation. Traffic was light today so I took an image to show the road markings and related infra. This light is a stop light for road users. Hence the ASL. Note the newer wider lead-in cycle lane to the ASL. Note the cycle logo on the tarmac ahead. There is no pedestrian or cyclist crossing at these lights. The cycle crossing is not yet in operation. It is located between this light and the next one: #186052, #186051. The pedestrian crossing is beyond that: #186055. See also: #186053, #186054. Other image today and links: #186045.Road environment:
Infrastructure
road
186049Photo #186049Image taken 8.9.22] Deangate, York. A Tern (www.ternbicycles.com/uk) with - possibly bespoke weather protection for the child seat. Compare with this ad hoc but perhaps no less effective arrangement: #186026. A folding box has been fixed to the front rack to provide carrying capacity for goods. The cycle uses the all-important capacious end of racks. There is more space here for larger/wider designs of cycle - bespoke or adapted. It is here because it needs more room... because to avoid sticking out into the road and being vulnerable to passing vehicles, the rider has used the end of rack space to be able to move it forward. If the racks were further out from the kerb the cycle would not need to be at this angle, would be more stable - though this one does have a stand - and would leave room on the facing end of rack for another cycle or group sharing a lock. The rack would also need protection in the form of bollards - see excellent example of protected provision (in all senses) at: #182710. Other image and links today: #186045.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
186048Photo #186048[Image taken 8.9.22] Aldwark junction with St Andrewgate, York. [Context: #185182] As I came to caption this image an update arrived from CYC: "The current status of your report is: unresolved. We’re currently coordinating resources so we can schedule the necessary works; in the meantime we thank you for your patience in this matter. The report details say:
"Location Details: Street Name: St Andrewgate Postcode:YO1 7BX
Additional Information: Resident reported - the puddle continues to form on Aldwark/St Andrewgate.
Dip in road means water can't drain away into nearby drain, please look as [sic] resurfacing".
As I passed this location some hours after rain today I saw the markings. I could see someone had been looking at something here. I could further see that the area with the orange paint was not where the puddling remains. The email update from CYC suggests they don't need my further image to alert them. Other image today and links: #186045.
Other:
Problem
general
186047Photo #186047[Image taken 8.9.22] Coppergate (Nessgate/Clifford Street end), York. I saw the new markings/the moved planter (context and links: #186045). I thought, The new markings are freshly painted and therefore very visible. They will stop motorists setting down in front of the gap. I stopped to take a photo. I crossed to King Street opposite. I took one photo and had no time to turn off my camera before a motorist stopped to let someone out… completely obstructing the gap intended for people turning left into Coppergate from Nessgate and right from Clifford Street. This is the fourth instance I have witnessed since the planter went in - July 2022 - despite my not using this route very frequently.Enforcement:
Problem
enforcement
186046Photo #186046[Image taken 8.9.22] Coppergate (Nessgate/Clifford Street end), York. Closeup of the markings. Context and links: #186045.Road environment:
Infrastructure
road
186045Photo #186045[Image taken 8.9.22] Coppergate (Nessgate/Clifford Street end), York. Context: #180531. The planter has been moved across towards the island. This means the gap to the right of it is too narrow for people on cycles to enter by. However, for people turning right from Clifford Street (not left from Nessgate) this means you are: (i) on a road wanting to make a right turn where the largest markings say, No right turn; (ii) on a road with a noticeable uphill; (iii) turning right at an angle across a road which has a further noticeable incline in the direction of travel; (iv) you may be doing it from a standstill – and aware of motor traffic building up behind you and having to trust that drivers behind will not try to squeeze by; (v) you will be doing it as fast as you can because the oncoming lane - Nessgate - is busy at all times including with large vehicles such as buses, and the other lane of Coppergate is also very busy including with taxis and buses, so you want to clear Clifford Street as soon as you can; BUT (iiv) you are now additionally competing for space at the entrance to Coppergate with people on cycles – including ‘York’ cycles – trikes, recumbents, cargo cycles… at that restricted space to the right of the planter… and you all have to be able to stop because there is a zebra immediately behind it.
I consider this new tweak - forcing all people on all designs and sizes of cycle to share the one space - adds stress and jeopardy to a piece of infra intended to support active travel… I still consider the planter needs to be centred in the opening but much shorter so right turners can use the space next to the central island and left turners have use of the kerb side area. I’d like to see this consulted on and will say so. Other images here today: #186046, #186047. Other images today: #186048, #186049, #186050, #186051, #186052, #186053, #186054, #186055.
Route sign:
Infrastructure
routesigns
186026Photo #186026[Image taken 7.9.22] Blake Street, York. There's so much to remember when lobbying for cycle parking or improvements. I try to remember the importance of it being under cover. For the children and the parents that use child seats... The seats often have a padded layer and/or cushions inside to soften the ride. And even if they don't and it rains, it's hard to wipe a seat sufficiently that the occupier does not get wet. No wonder then if people decide to take a car or the child has bad memories of cycling such that when it grows up it too turns its back on active travel, at least in wet weather. The image is also a reminder that cycle parking needs to be sufficiently far from the upright in front that the cycle is stable and that the rails of toastracks mean cycles with shorter wheelbases - most? - cannot straddle both rails. The result is, as here, the cycle is unstable. This makes it difficult to load/unload - even more of a problem if it is a person you are carrying. It also means you have to lift the cycle over the rail(s) when arriving and departing. Some people cannot do this due to limited strength or a mobility issue. Others can't do it because cycles are heavy and/or unwieldy. These two things are exacerbated if there is a large child seat onboard as here. The image is also a reminder that cycle parking that is substandard (see: extreme example: #185999, and a not much better one: #185920) does not have space for someone to stand next to the cycle and be able to load/unload human or other cargo, or may not have space above it for taller designs of cycle or attachments such as child seats, for example at two-tier design parking: #170490. Another example of (likely bespoke) weather protection for a childseat: #186049. And without... #186151.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
186008Photo #186008[Image taken 6.9.22] Rawcliffe, at the rec, near St Mark's Grove, York. [NOTE: No streetview at this location] Tier hire e-cycle. Tier hire e-scooters. Overview and links: #186008. Other image today and links: #186002.Bike share:
Infrastructure
bikeshare
186007Photo #186007[Image taken 6.9.22] Clifton Backies, close to car park on Water Lane/Woodland Chase, York. [Note: No street view at this location. Location approximate.] Context: #186006. Other image here today and links: #186002. Cycle wheel in one of these holes a year ago when I thought the danger bad enough to photograph then... #175196.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
186006Photo #186006[Image taken 6.9.22] Clifton Backies, close to car park on Water Lane/Woodland Chase, York. [Note: No street view at this location. Location approximate.] The danger the damage constitutes here is exacerbated by it being in the centre of the (narrow) non motorised-users path, and being on a blind bend (image of location in other direction: #186007). There was a constant stream of people on cycles, on foot and a person pushing a young person in a wheelchair. I would have added to the hazards had I tried to measure the width and depth of the damage here. Other image here today and links: #186002.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
186005Photo #186005[Image taken 6.9.22] Clifton Backies, York. [Note: No street view at this location. Location approximate.] My cycle showing how far in my wheel goes in this crevasse (see: #186004). Other image here today and links: #186002.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
186004Photo #186004[Image taken 6.9.22] Clifton Backies, York. [Note: No street view at this location. Location approximate.] There is an additional hazard here – a difference of 3cm in height between the two sides of the damage: 7cm and 10cm. The width of the gap is 3cm. Other image here today and links: #186002.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
186003Photo #186003[Image taken 6.9.22] Clifton Backies, York. [Note: No street view at this location. Location approximate.] I was taking a photo of damage nearby when I heard a shout and brakes. This cyclist just rescued himself from this crevasse. It was in the same location as: #186002. I asked if I could take a photo – he has skinny (racing) tyres – to show how far his wheel went in.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
186002Photo #186002[Image taken 6.9.22] Clifton Backies, York. [Note: No street view at this location. Location approximate.] The crevasse is 5cm wide and 6cm deep in places. The Backies is a nature reserve (www.york.gov.uk/directory-record/588/clifton-backies-local-nature-reserve). It is not lit after dark. It is difficult to avoid the deep long cracks in daylight as the path is narrow and there are many other users of a variety of modes. I use the route much, much less due to the damage. I don't use it at all after dark. In winter, in bad weather, that can be from 14.30. And winter 2022 is fast approaching. People who work or work shifts and use the route to get to/from their employment are at risk from the damage. But also children going to/from school. Other images this problem here today: #186003, #186004, #186005, #186006, #186007, and on an earlier date, for someone pushing a buggy: #185794. Same problem Rawcliffe Country Park: #185998. Other image today: #186008.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
186001Photo #186001[Image taken 5.9.22] Burger King, Clifton Moor, York. Plus points: the box for cycle parking has been checked. The racks are close to the entrance and easy to find. They are overlooked which might help keep cycles safe particularly those of staff working nights and after dark. The drop kerb leading to the entrance could also be used by people using the cycle parking. But... the racks meet no standards: #185999; #186001. They should be a minimum of 100cm apart so you can fit two cycles between the uprights. If the end space visible in this image were further from the kerb - around 150cm - it could be used by wider - york'cycles (see: #183747) and family groups: #185180. 120cm is much more practical and is the minimum width space between uprights I would like to see set. Other image today and links: #185997.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
186000Photo #186000[Image taken 5.9.22] Burger King, Clifton Moor, York. As I stood taking photos, a staff member cycled up. He used the end space because his cycle would not fit anywhere else. End spaces (see: #183749) ought to be marked for family/disabled use (see: #170171). Staff should have separate secure weatherproof cycle storage. Other image this problem today and links: #185999.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
185999Photo #185999[Image taken 5.9.22] Burger King, Clifton Moor, York. This branch of Burger King burnt down. (Link to newspaper report: #174310.) It is a drive thru. It has been rebuilt. It has toastrack Sheffields by way of cycle parking. This is the worst-spaced provision I have found yet. The upstand is a 5cm barrier. The space between the uprights is just 37cm. This is not accessible to people with mobility issues, with luggage on their cycle, a child onboard, wanting to lock share, riding a 'York' cycle ie a two or more-wheeled cycle used for mobility, utility or family purposes... Other images this problem here today: #186000, #186001.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
185998Photo #185998[Image taken 5.9.22] Rawcliffe Country Park/Rawcliffe Bar Park & Ride, York. [Note: No street view at this location.] Context and links: #185997. Same problem Clifton Backies: #186002.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
185997Photo #185997[Image taken 5.9.22] Rawcliffe Country Park/Rawcliffe Bar Park & Ride, York. [Note; No street view at this location.] The dry weather is causing ravines to open up in our motor traffic-free routes. This one is 7cm across at this point and 8cm deep. For how far a typical cycle tyre can sink into one see: #185998. Terrifying. The route is used in all levels of light by all ages and levels experience of rider on all sizes of cycle - there's NCN65 just 50m ahead, and the pump track adjacent to this damage. It's also used by people - including children - with scooters and others in wheelchairs. Other image this problem here today: #185998. Other images today: #185999, #186000, #186001.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
185922Photo #185922[Image taken 2.9.22] Home Bargains, Clifton Moor/Rawclife, York. There are no cycle racks at the Food Warehouse (see: #185879) or Smyths (see: #185880). There is no signage telling customers there is cycle parking. There are no signs directing people to the cycle parking. I didn't find them on my previous visit. Not surprisingly as these racks are not even close to the entrance to Home Bargains. The street view link shows there were previously 15 'wheelbenders'' (as well as 4 Sheffields). Why did we not get a further 8 Sheffields? By contrast there are many car parking spaces and some are very close to all of the outlets here. Other images this problem today and links: #185920.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
185921Photo #185921[UPDATE: CBRE, the estate managing agent, responded: "We have again looked into this matter. CBRE’s H&S auditor advises there are no government regulations for cycle storage racks, but guidance as per your email. I appreciate your comments that they may not suit all, but reiterate that there are facilities on site, including the outer hoops as more accessible." I have re-referred this to planning in the hope it can enforce provision that meets at least the minimum of CYC standards - 100cm between uprights. And, I hope, more than four racks (8 spaces) for three retail outlets...] Image taken 2.9.22] Home Bargains, Clifton Moor/Rawclife, York. 60cm between uprights is 40cm less than the minimum required and 60 less than the practical recommended distance. The space in front of the racks is just 28cm. This is the space you need to be able to roll your cycle forwards so it can rest stably on the stand or, if loaded, on the rear upright (see: #185796). Many of the cycles were at an angle and therefore unstable. The resulting 'jack knifing' means they taking up more space than they should - reducing what's available for other users. Context and links: #185920.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
185920Photo #185920[Image taken 2.9.22] Home Bargains, Clifton Moor/Rawclife, York. I returned today. I found - just - four Sheffield stands (cycle racks) but was unable to use them as the usable spaces were full. Could they be the 'staff provision' too? The racks are under cover - a positive - but there is just 60cm between the uprights. Understandably, the ends of racks were in use. (Another thing I learned about substandard cycle parking – if you have flowers in your pannier and you need to lean that side of the cycle against the wall, you will break at least some of the stems/heads.) Space is not a problem here. I will email planning about the racks being less than the minimum CYC stipulates and half the recommended distance of 120cm between uprights. If the spacing between the racks were a minimum of 120cm - ie usable comfortably by people with baskets, panniers... and family/friend groups sharing locks, the ends of racks could be marked with disabled or family or cargo cycle parking stickers. Other images this problem today: #185921, plus a further issue: the location of the racks: #185922. Earlier image and links about the (lack of) cycle parking at this retail park: #185881.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
185881Photo #185881[Newer images: 2.9.22: #185920, #185921, #185922] [Image taken 31.8.22] Home Bargains, Clifton Moor/Rawclife, York. Home Bargains (corporate.homebargains.co.uk/) used to be a ToysRUs. There used to be Sheffield stands (cycleparking ) here – you can see them on street view from July 2018: goo.gl/maps/3gmKhAgvpjYLXTf47. There were 4 supports ie spaces for 8 cycles. They were under cover. There were also 15 ‘wheelbenders’ the other side of the entrance: goo.gl/maps/8gZkdc38UrAmLuh89 Now it seems there is no cycle parking. I will check this with planning. I will also ask the company as it is certain to help: "What sets us so far apart from our competitors? Is it our customer-centric remit? Our open buying policy? The positive working environments we encourage? Hey, maybe it’s simply our dedication to selling top brands at the lowest possible price. Whatever it is, we have no intention of changing a thing. …Well, except for our ever-increasing number of stores!" Other image here today and links: #185879.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
185880Photo #185880[Image taken 31.8.22] Smyths, Clifton Moor/Rawclife, York. There's room for a display of garden play equipment in an enclosure and a basketball net on a stand. There are two covered trolley parks. But no cycle parking. Other image here today and links: #185877.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
185879Photo #185879[Image taken 31.8.22] Smyths, the Food Warehouse, Clifton Moor/Rawclife, York. No cycle parking despite there being excellent traffic-free routes to/from/around here and residential areas close by. Oh, and Smyths is a toy shop... There's also a McDonald's around 50m to the left of the camera position. I will check the planning portal. Other images here today: #185880, #185881. Other image today and links: #185877.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
185878Photo #185878[Image taken 31.8.22] St Andrewgate, York. Two vehicles obstruct the bollards. I could just squeeze through the gap. (One of my panniers was empty, the other was not full.) But the drivers have stopped on double yellows and are obstructing an example of filtered permeability. One vehicle had someone in it on the passenger side but no driver. There was someone in the drivers seat in the other. The point of the bollards is to close the route to motor vehicles other than emergency services responding to calls while keeping it open to non-motorised users. I am baffled that some motorists can manage to take and pass a driving test but can't see the consequences of their actions as here. Other image today and links: #185877.Enforcement:
Problem
enforcement
185877Photo #185877[Image taken 31.8.22] Library Square, York. I’ve seen a leather strap on a downtube like this once before. That owner explained it helped him lift/carry the cycle, up steps and on to trains, for example. This cycle has an open frame. It also has permanent panniers. Definitely a 'York'cycle - adapted/kitted out for utility use. Other images today: #185878, #185879, #185880, #185881.Bicycle:
Good practice
bicycles
185871Photo #185871[Image taken 30.8.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. (NOTE: The cyclist was posing as the focus of my image. The point is the vehicle on the pavement behind.) A regular problem... drivers parking on pavements. School summer holidays are nearly over and the empty streets have filled up with parked motor vehicles. As have the pavements. Many people arrive by cycle to visit this Age UK outlet (www.ageuk.org.uk/york/shops/). Some Sheffield stands would be helpful. There's room in the curtilage of the property. They might also help protect against people leaving bags of items outside the shop when it's closed.Enforcement:
Problem
enforcement
185805Photo #185805[Image taken 27.8.22] Monks Cross Retail Park, Monks Cross, Huntington/York. Context: #185804. A Homesense employee helps the customer load his purchase. Thereby condoning the parking on the cycle circuit.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
185804Photo #185804[Image taken 27.8.22] Monks Cross Retail Park, Monks Cross, Huntington/York. Context: #185277. A Homesense customer parks on the cycle circuit while he goes into the shop. A cyclist (also a retail park customer) has to leave what should be a safe route that links all the outlets and use the road. See loading: #185805. Other image today and links: #185802.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
185803Photo #185803[Image taken 27.8.22] Looking towards New Lane from the shared use route to/from the bus station, Huntington/York. Context: #183650. Other image today and links: #185802.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
185802Photo #185802[Image taken 27.8.22] Boyes, Goodramgate, York. No room at the racks. The owner of the freestanding cycle was unable to park. He is therefore 'bike sitting' rather than accompanying his partner, and shopping in Boyes (www.boyes.co.uk/york-e5a/). Two further cycles are secured on street furniture. Other images today: #185803, #185804, #185805.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
185799Photo #185799[Image taken 26.8.22] Clifton Backies, York. This is a York barrier. My front panniers came off as I tried to pass through. Then I stuck fast. My pedal is wedged against the lower part of this obstruction. It took to-ing and fro-ing and lifting to get free. These mean routes are neither accessible nor inclusive. They also mean cargo cycles – commercial or not – cannot pass. The latest email about removing physical barriers of all kinds round the city says there are over 800… Other images of problems here today and links: #185797. Other image today and links: #185795.Obstruction:
Problem
obstructions
185798Photo #185798[Image taken 26.8.22] Clifton Backies, York. [NOTE: No street view at this location.] Narrow, overgrown, rough, uneven... Other image here today and links: #185797.Track:
Problem
track
185797Photo #185797[Image taken 26.8.22] Clifton Backies, York. [NOTE: No street view at this location.] Clear signposting. Needs distances though. It is categorically a cycle route. But see: #185798, #185799. Problems with the Backies route: #185794. Other image and links today: #185795.Route sign:
Problem
routesigns
185796Photo #185796[Image taken 26.8.22] York. The racks are too close to the wall. I had full panniers. I could not get my cycle far enough in to securely and reliably lean it against the racks. (The luggage was too heavy to take off and carry inside. But it would have been difficult because I couldn't stand next to the cycle/the panniers to access to my panniers. See: #185795.) I had to lift/force my cycle into a position where it would stay. It was unstable. It was also even more difficult/unwieldy to get out. All of these problems mean the cycle parking is neither accessible nor practical. And this is an NHS/health facility.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
185795Photo #185795[Image taken 26.8.22] Yorvik Gillygate Practice, [www.jorvikgillygatepractice.co.uk/] Woolpack House, St Saviour's Place, York. The racks are too close together. Other images of a problem with this parking today: #185796. Other images today: #185797, #185798, #185799.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
185794Photo #185794[More recent image this problem here and links: #186002] [Image taken 24.8.22] Clifton Backies, York. [NOTE: No street view at this location. Position approximate.] The drought is taking a toll on all the traffic-free non-road routes around the city. Cracks have appeared where I haven't seen any before. They make using a cycle or a wheelchair or pushing a buggy truly hazardous. The mother could not see her front wheels. Plus the dappled light means some stretches of this route are quite dark. Further the evenings are noticeably drawing in. People working shifts use this route. If it's all but impassable now will it be possible to use it during the dark?Track:
Problem
track
185773Photo #185773[Image taken 23.8.22] Library Square, Museum Street/Lendal Bridge, York. Two Tier e-cycles (overview #164663) obstruct Sheffields but do not use them. The cycle parking here is hugely in demand: from people visiting the library to those walking into town. I am very uncomfortable that CYC has not, at any stage, consulted residents on any of the Tier products plans. Extending the agreement to the scheme cycles and scooters being able to use public racks (see: #185003) feels as if a commercial company is getting a lot but giving little. It is redolent of the Terry Ave debacle (see: #164095).Bike share:
Problem
bikeshare
185682Photo #185682[Image taken 20.8.22] James Street, York. This 'cycle lane' sign has bothered me for a while so today I stopped to take an image. It's ambiguous at best. Or is it wrong? Is it directing people to turn left along the Foss Islands Path (NCN658/Tang Hall/Derwenthorpe)? Because it's after the first turn that would take you there and a long way from the second. But it's also on a cycle route that continues alongside the road with a white line 'segregating' cyclists from pedestrians. I think this needs to come out. It does not offer route finding assistance. It introduces confusion. The turn here is so low key (blind bend, narrow) as to make people query if it is where they need to go. This unassuming gap leads to a long-distance route as well as an important local cycle-ped-wheelchair link that is direct and fast - no junctions, no traffic lights. This does need signposting - but with the route number, destinations and distances. A starting point might be a cycle symbol painted on the tarmac with a turn arrow ahead of the junction with NCN658. There's got to be a way to support long-distance riders and local people with route-finding here. Other image today and links: #185677.Route sign:
Problem
routesigns
185681Photo #185681[Image taken 20.8.22] Monks Cross retail centre, Huntington/York. Well used cycle parking... But two motorcyclists arrived as I was leaving. They drove from the corner over this area. One is obstructing the cycle parking. Related image today: #185680. Other image today and links: #185677.Enforcement:
Problem
enforcement

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