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All photos in & around York

Showing items 1 to 100 from total of 940 items. Ordered by photo # descending.

Photo # Icon Photo Caption Categorisation
167158Photo #167158[Image taken 14.4.21] Asda, Monks Cross, (Wigginton), York. A bollard blocks access to/from the outermost racks. See also: #167156, #167157Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
167157Photo #167157[Image taken 14.4.21] Asda, Monks Cross, (Wigginton), York. There are wheel benders in the background. There are Sheffields with good natural light (some under cover) and good natural surveillance. But the bollard blocks access to/from the outermost racks. See also: #167156, #167158Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
167156Photo #167156[Image taken 14.4.21] Asda, Monks Cross, (Wigginton), York. The bollards are presumably intended to protect the Sheffields (racks) from motor vehicles accessing the space where I was standing to take this image. However, the ones at each end of the row behind the cycle with the orange panniers also block access to the racks from the same space. (Bollards issues here see also: #167157, #167158. For cycle parking issues at other supermarkets see: #167030 (and further links in the caption)Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
167155Photo #167155[Image taken 14.4.21] Sheffields (racks) at Monks Cross, (Wigginton), York. The aisle (gap between the racks) is just 187cm wide. There was no room for me to be able to reverse out without lifting my cycle. For a second view of this site see also: #167154. For protective bollards blocking racks at Asda, Monks Cross, see: #167156Other:
Infrastructure
general
167154Photo #167154[Image taken 14.4.21] Sheffields (racks) in front of Boots and next to Greggs, Monks Cross, (Wigginton), York. The aisle (gap between the racks) is just 187cm wide. The racks on the other side were in use. Baskets on the front of cycles often cause the wheel to turn. The narrowness of the aisle meant I needed to be able to roll my cycle backwards into the space between the Sheffields behind. I couldn't. Therefore I had to do a vertical multiple-point turn. Not everyone can lift their cycle at any time. I would have struggled had my panniers been full ie had I been to the supermarket before visiting Boots. For a closer image see: #167155. For protective bollards blocking racks at Asda, Monks Cross, see: #167156. (Note: Streetview shows the previous design of this retail park)Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
167118Photo #167118[Image taken 13.4.21] Library Square (Museum Street/Lendal Bridge), York. During covid-19 lockdowns, the previously safe and 'human-feeling' space in front of York Explore (library, cafe, events space) has become a de facto parking area. Police have used it for initiatives (pulling over drivers and checking them). More frequently, much more frequently, food delivery drivers such as those from Deliveroo leave their motor vehicles here while they collect the order. The middle driver seemed to be doing this. I don't know the reason for the other vehicles here. There were blue badge spaces in front of the building, to the right of the entrance. (There are cycle racks on the other side.) The whole of the front of the building is covered in scaffolding at present so none of the parking spaces (car or cycle) are in use. Taxi drivers also use Library Square to pick up and set down. The vehicles and their - often sudden - movements mean the space no longer feels safe or welcoming. The motor vehicles also bring pollution danger with them. Just round the corner is Exhibition Square. It too should be a people space but feels like parking. See: #160855. While the triangle on Rougier Street simply feels like the space under the stairs where you chuck all the things you can't think where to put them see: #164846.Enforcement:
Problem
enforcement
167117Photo #167117[Image taken 13.4.21] Bootham, York. Driver turning out of queueing traffic to travel on the wrong side of the road (the oncoming carriageway) into Marygate. See also: #167116Road environment:
Problem
road
167116Photo #167116[Image taken 13.4.21] Bootham, York. When there is queuing traffic towards Bootham Bar, some drivers heading for Marygate (perhaps the car park at the end) get impatient. They turn out of the queue and drive on the wrong side of the road in the direction of oncoming vehicles. The driver usually cuts the corner and so cannot see anything turning out of Marygate. I've seen some drivers drive from as far back as the park on the wrong side. I've seen drivers waiting to turn in to Marygate on the wrong side of the carriageway on the wrong side of the junction when a group of school children were crossing the mouth of Marygate. See also: #167117. Skip, at this location see: #167114.Road environment:
Problem
road
167115Photo #167115[Image taken 13.4.21] Bootham, York. This skip 'shelters' two or three cars. There are double yellows but I don't know the rules governing their use here. See also #167114.Obstruction:
Problem
obstructions
167114Photo #167114[Image taken 13.4.21] A skip on Bootham, junction with Marygate, York. Bootham has queueing or oncoming motor traffic for much of the day/evening. The vehicles reduce the road space. The skip been here for months. It has no flashing lights. It is an issue for me when I cycle: do I 'take the lane' all the way from the junction where I was in the ASL? This means I am part of the traffic but perhaps holding drivers up. Or do I keep left and get trapped as I get closer and have to stop and wait to move my heavy cycle back into the moving traffic. A friend tells me it's a problem for him, too. I use Bootham most days. Something like this impacts on my feeling safe and likelihood of using a cycle. I would also not feel confident about cycling with someone who didn't know about this issue here and could make their own call on how to handle it, or with a child who would be reliant on my making a safe decision. #167115Obstruction:
Problem
obstructions
167105Photo #167105[Image taken 12.4.21] Rawcliffe Bar, York, Park and Ride. See also (this location): #167104. For issues at the ladies loos at York station see: #166524Other:
Problem
general
167104Photo #167104Update:
An email from City of York Council dated 13.4.21 says: "We are working with First to open the toilets for longer. These toilets have been vandalised on numerous occasions. First did not have the capacity to have someone up at the site until it closes even pre pandemic, which has made them vulnerable to vandalism.
First are addressing this and recognise that with lockdown easing they could see more people coming to the site and have been exploring options for security to prevent or catch the culprits that have been causing the vandalism."
[Image taken 12.4.21] Rawcliffe Bar, York, Park and Ride. The toilets here now have reduced hours. It's not just bus passengers that use them. The leisure area around is Rawcliffe Bar Country Park www.york.gov.uk/RawcliffeBarCountryPark Alongside the open, green spaces, there's a large play area with a climbing rock and pump tracks. There's a route linking the riverside route (NCN65 www.sustrans.org.uk/find-a-route-on-the-national-cycle-network/route-65) and residential areas. Cycling (and walking) groups park here before going for a ride (walk). I am concerned the reduced hours will lead to urban fouling and limit who come here after school and in the evenings. Isn't this a clear example of where a toilet scheme like the one in London Borough of Southwark www.southwark.gov.uk/business/join-the-community-toilet-scheme or the first one I heard of, in the City, www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/services/streets/clean-streets/community-toilet-scheme-cts is needed?
See also (this location): #167105. For issues at the ladies loos at York station see: #166524
Other:
Problem
general
167103Photo #167103[Image taken 12.4.21] Shambles Market, York. Old images on the back of the M&S building lift an unloved area. See also: #167102. (Hoardings overview): #165189Road environment:
Good practice
road
167102Photo #167102[Image taken 12.4.21] Shambles Market, York. Not sure if this and its companion are true hoardings or simply historic photos of street scenes on a window. But they do show how imagery provides interest, and improves a scruffy area and makes it feel safer. See also: #167103. (Hoardings overview): #165189Road environment:
Good practice
road
167039Photo #167039[Image taken 9.4.21] This Winther Cargoo extends around 119cm in front of the Sheffield and around 28cm behind it. The Sheffield is 75cm long. See also: #167038. All cycles need turning space for the owner to be able to move them in and out without needing to lift them and perform vertical multiple point turns. The latest government guidance is in LTN 1/20. (I am unable to load the link.) Refer to Table 5-1: Size and minimum turning circles of cycles.Other:
Infrastructure
general
167038Photo #167038[Image taken 10.4.21] With 120cm between them, the Sheffield stands on Butcher Terrace, Rowntree Park, York are practically and accessibly spaced. The Winther Cargoo (see also: #167039) extends 28cm beyond the rack at the back. See: #167037 for a side-on view of the front. For other comparative cycle dimensions see: (unadapted cycle): #166715, (cycle with panniers): #166716, (post bike): #166688Other:
Infrastructure
general
167037Photo #167037[Image taken 10.4.21] Sheffield stands in use on Butcher Terrace, Rowntree Park, York. This Cargoo cycle shows how much space different designs of cycle require around them. For other comparative cycle dimensions see: (unadapted cycle): #166715, (cycle with panniers): #166716, (post bike): #166688Other:
Infrastructure
general
167036Photo #167036[Image taken 9.4.21] Butcher Terrace, York. These Sheffields are at the entrance to Rowntree Park and among the green spaces at this end of the Millennium Bridge. So they are where they are useful. They are easy to find. They are clearly recognisable as cycle parking. They are on a piece of hard standing created to house them. They are 120cm apart. This means there's room for a wider cycle but there is still space for another person or a family sharing a lock to park on the opposite Sheffield and for the owners to be able to manoeuvre. The lack of a barrier around the site enables people to roll a cycle in and roll it out in the same direction. This means cycle parking is accessible to people with limited mobility, physical health issues, larger or heavier cycles and/or who are carrying cargo or passengers. For dimensions of this cycle (a Winther Cargoo) and this space see also: #167038, #167039) Locking see: #167016Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
167035Photo #167035[Image taken 9.4.21] Rougier Street, York. The black box on the right has been installed too close to the Sheffields. 25cm is insufficient for a cycle to be positioned such that it is supported. For comparative dimensions see (unadapted cycle): #166715, (post bike): #166688, (Babboe) #166718. For an overview of issues at this location including the cycle parking, information totem, Tier (hire) scooter bays, see: #164846Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
167034Photo #167034[Image taken 9.4.21] Rougier Street, York. The information totem (installed early 2021) blocks easy, convenient access to/from the Sheffield (cycle parking) stands for all but fit, thin people who are wider at the shoulders than below wheeling unadorned cycles (see: #166751). There is just 91cm to the footplate or 101 cm to the totem from this 'unadapted' cycle. For comparative dimensions see (unadapted cycle): #166715, (post bike): #166688, (Babboe) #166718. For an overview of issues at this location including the cycle parking, information totem, Tier (hire) scooter bays, see: #164846Other:
Infrastructure
general
167033Photo #167033[Image taken 9.4.21] Rougier Street, York. The driver of a Travelodge vehicle avoids loading taking place on the left but uses the contraflow cycle lane to do so. At the junction, a metre further up, the driver turns right (not shown) and therefore blocks entry to the contraflow. For an overview of issues at this location including the cycle parking, information totem, Tier (hire) scooter bays, see: #164846Road environment:
Problem
road
167032Photo #167032[Image taken 9.4.21] Early green for cyclists in York. It's on Skeldergate in the direction of North Street (junction with Micklegate and Bridge Street). There's also one on the other side of this junction ie in this direction. Drivers seem to be watching the cyclists (now also Tier e-scooters - overview: #164663) not the lights because motorists often (perhaps even 'usually') move off when cyclists do.Road environment:
Good practice
road
167031Photo #167031[Image taken 9.4.21] Marygate car park York. Sheffields partially blocked. Work seems to have stopped for the timebeing but the barriers remain. There's still no shortage of other space in the car park for siting the materials store. You can't cycle if there's no cycle parking. You need to be able to rely on the cycle parking being usable. The allocating of the area adjacent to the Sheffields (CYC) and the not challenging it (the contractors), shows we still have a long way to go with getting cycling and its related infrastructure normalised and embedded in the understanding of individuals, companies and councils. See also: #165769Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
167030Photo #167030[Image taken 3.2.20] Lidl, James Street, York. The Sheffield (racks) are easy to find, recognise as cycle parking and access. They are under cover. They are in a well lit location. You do not need to cross road to move between them and the shop/trolleys. BUT, as at too many other supermarkets, they neither near the shop entrance or exit, nor the trolley bays. The image shows there is space. The image shows trolleys for use with wheelchairs. I think developers/designers/the relevant people at the supermarkets don't use a cycle to shop so don't see there is a problem. What is the issue? 1. You arrive with luggage. It may be empty and light or you may have come from somewhere else (work, another shop, etc) and it be heavy and bulky. 2. You arrive with a child/children on your cycle. In both cases you need to get to the trolley bays (at this Lidl they are round the corner **beyond** the shop entrance/exit so you need to avoid people going in/out). Do you leave your children and/or your luggage on the cycle/close to it unattended/unsupervised while you go and get a trolley (you need to put a token/coin in the ones here) and then return to collect them? Or do you leave the luggage unattended on your cycle and carry the child/children to the trolleys and load them and return to your cycle for the luggage? Or do you leave the luggage unattended on your cycle for the duration of your visit? When you have completed the shop you have the reverse issue. Do you return the trolley to the bay and schlepp your shopping to your cycle? That way it's not left unattended? Or do you take the trolley with the shopping and your child/children to your cycle? Do you load up and leave it/them unattended while you return the trolley? When trolleys are not near the cycle parking, you might need to make four extra trips. Possibly carrying/accompanied by children. The racks at Asda, Layerthorpe, York (see: #166151) and Asda, Harrogate (see: #166186) are close to the trolleys and these are close to the entrance. For people arriving with luggage and dependants there are luggage-carrying/child-toting trips involved but they are very short.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
167016Photo #167016[Image taken 9.4.21] Butcher Terrace/TerryAve/Rowntree Park/Millennium Bridge, York. A Winther Cargoo cargo bike shackled to a Sheffield (and two tiny cycles). See also: #167015Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
167015Photo #167015[Image taken 9.4.21] Sheffields at Butcher Terrace/Terry Ave/Rowntree Park/Millennium Bridge, York. A Winther Cargoo cargo bike shackled (see: #167016) to a Sheffield rack and two kids' cycles. These Sheffields are 120cm apart. Excellent practice - room for all. Compare with: #166369Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
166757Photo #166757[Image taken 4.4.21] The locations of the Tier scooter bays, the Sheffields, and the road (Tanner Row) on Rougier Street, York. (See also: #166751, #166752, #166753, #166754, #166755, #166756)Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
166756Photo #166756[Image taken 4.4.21] Rougier Street, York. For these Sheffields, the gap between the rack and the road is 125cm. See: #166755 and #166754Other:
Infrastructure
general
166755Photo #166755[Image taken 4.4.21] Rougier Street, York. For some Sheffields at this location, the gap between the rack and the road is just 104cm. See also: #166754, #166756Other:
Infrastructure
general
166754Photo #166754[Image taken 4.4.21] Rougier Street, York. The paved area narrows from one end of the racks to the other. The gap between the rack and the road is 104cm at its narrowest point and 125cm at the widest. See: #166755 and: #166756Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
166753Photo #166753[Image taken 4.4.21] Rougier Street, York. There is just 121cm between the racks and the scooter bays. This is the corridor (access to /from) between the racks and the scooters. It needs to accommodate someone wheeling a cycle if they can do so (see: #166751) or riding it if the person is unable to push. Image: #166715 shows that even a cycle with no mudguards typically extends 40cm backwards from a rack. That leaves less than a metre for someone to be able to move between the scooters and the racks. And this assumes there are no longer machines on the cycle racks, scooters parked outside the bays, and that the person is able-bodied with the shape of a tall man - ie wider above all the objects (handlebars of scooters and cycles). If the person has pushed their cycle in from the Tanner Row side, it could extend further forward, reducing the corridor even further - 60cm in the case of the previous example. These cycles require more space: post bike: #166688 - 190cm long; Babboe: #166718 - 236cm long.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
166752Photo #166752[Image taken 4.4.21] Rougier Street, York. Three scooters are squeezed longwise into the bays further reducing the space for accessing the Sheffield racks and getting a cycle into/out of them this side. You can see how they block access to this side of the information totem too (the solid upright shape to the left of the scooters). See also: #166751Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
166751Photo #166751[Image taken 4.4.21] Rougier Street, York. Access to the cycle parking is too tight - even for a tall man who is able-bodied and wheeling an unadapted, unadorned cycle. See also: #166752, #166753Other:
Infrastructure
general
166750Photo #166750[Image taken 4.4.21] Rougier Street, York. The new wayfinding/information totem is too close to the cycle parking.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
166738Photo #166738[Image taken 4.4.21] Tower Gardens, Tower Street, York. This Babboe is around 236cm long and around 85cm wide. Many people in York use longer and wider cycles (including trailers: #164541, #166522, #164845) to transport children, animals, shopping, loads... For Babboe length see: #166718 (and for comparative dimensions links)Cycle parking:
Infrastructure
cycleparking
166718Photo #166718[Image taken 4.4.21] Tower Gardens, Tower Street, York. This is a Babboe. It is around 236cm long and around 85cm wide. There is space at this location for wider and longer machines. I'd like to see something like the initiative at the University of York that asks people who don't need the additional space(s) at the outside end of the clump of stands, to leave it free for cycles that do see: #165049. For width see: #166738. For other comparative cycle dimensions see (unadapted cycle): #166715, (cycle with panniers): #166716, (post bike): #166688Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
166716Photo #166716[Image taken 4.4.21] Outside York Explore, Museum Street, York. This is my cycle. It has front and rear panniers (bike bags). The front ones remain on it because they carry my locks. They make my cycle 72cm wide as a minimum. (There is space in them for me to carry additional items, for example any litter I pick up, or shopping.) This is the widest part of my ‘parked’ cycle. The rear panniers make the cycle 60cm wide when not additionally laden. For comparative dimensions see (unadapted cycle): #166715, (post bike): #166688, (Babboe) #166718Cycle parking:
Infrastructure
cycleparking
166715Photo #166715[Image taken 4.4.21] Outside York Explore, Museum Street, York. An example of an as ‘unadorned’, unadapted cycle as you get. And rare in York. But it still takes up 170cm: 60cm in front of the rack and 40cm behind. (The rack – of the recommended Sheffield design - is 70cm.) This is without access or exiting space being taken into account. See also the lengths of the cycles (post bike): #166688, (Babboe): #166718Cycle parking:
Infrastructure
cycleparking
166711Photo #166711[Image taken 4.4.21] Outside York Explore, Museum Street, York. The spacing in front of the racks is 69cm. 70cm is the minimum recommended (LTN 1/20). This would be inadequate for some machines eg: #166521 Compare the space here with that in: #166686. For length of bikes see: #166715, #166738 See Chapter 11 of LTN 1/20 for comprehensive reasons for and dimensions required, for cycle parking provision.Cycle parking:
Infrastructure
cycleparking
166699Photo #166699[Image taken 4.4.21] There are banks of Sheffields in Rowntree Park, York and close to the entrances. They are well used. These are close to the table tennis, the smaller of the two play areas, and the toilets (the brick building in the background). This means there is cycle parking at the point people need it. (See also: #166369)Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
166698Photo #166698[Image taken 4.4.21] Near New Bridge Lane, York. This 'self service' noticeboard always looks well used. It is likely much cheaper to source, install and maintain than the glass fronted ones administered by the wards. I often stop and look to see what's (new) on it. Noticeboards inform but also create a talking point for people who find themselves looking at the same time as others. So they'd seem to build community too. Are there negatives to them? I'd like to see one at the riverside end of Marygate car park. I envisage it being used for official notices such as route closures, changes to the rail station layout and the area around it; for consultations relevant to the local area and any affecting people who walk, cycle, wheelchair, scoot; and for upcoming cycling/walking events.Other:
Good practice
general
166697Photo #166697[Image taken 4.4.21] Rowntree Park, York. Another family sharing locks and rack space. (See also: #166369)Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
166691Photo #166691[Image taken 6.4.21] Lidl, James Street, York. Two issues. Problem 1. The cycle parking is nowhere near the trolleys or the supermarket entrance/exit - see: #167030. Problem 2. The cycle parking is on a slope. I need both hands to load my cycle - and keep it upright due to the incline. I don't have a spare hand to keep hold of the trolley. They roll away - into the car park. There is a real danger they could hit someone and cause injury or collide with a vehicle and cause damage. This problem is not specific to this outlet. Overview of this Lidl cycle parking here: #157917.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
166690Photo #166690[Image taken 6.4.21] Lidl, James Street, York. On a slope or if racks are too close to an object, cycles can't stay upright and topple. This makes loading/unloading difficult. Here it means the cycle takes up more space between Sheffields than it should. It also has consequences for the trolley... See: #166691. Overview of cycle parking here: #157917Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
166689Photo #166689[Image taken 6.4.21] Lidl, James Street, York. The racks are on a perceptible slope. My cycle slips and won't stay upright. (See also: #166690) For a further consequence of the slope see: #166691. For generic observations about the cycle parking here see: #157917Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
166688Photo #166688[Image taken 6.4.21] Lidl, James Street, York. The large amount of space between the racks and the car parking means people can park longer cycles here. This cycle, for example, is 190cm long. At the widest point - the handlebars - it is around 70cm wide. There's also no issue with turning circles for longer or heavier (shopping-laden) machines or for people who would struggle to lift their cycle and do a vertical multiple-point turn to get it out. (Cycles don't have reverse gears.) See also: Lidl racks: #166685, #166686, #166687. Lidl racks slope issues: #166689, #166690, #166691Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
166687Photo #166687[Image taken 6.4.21] Lidl, James Street, York. Good access to the cycle parking from the car park (access route). The racks are not blocked by car parking spaces unlike at Aldi, Clifton Moor. The racks are flat-topped Sheffields, 70cm long. See also: Lidl racks: #166685, #166686, #166688. Lidl racks slope issues: #166689, #166690, #166691Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
166686Photo #166686[Image taken 6.4.21] Lidl, James Street, York. Space (82cm) in front of the racks accommodates standard cycles easily. The racks are under cover, well lit and with lots of natural surveillance. See also: Asda Harrogate (good practice): #166185 Lidl racks: #166685, #166687, #166688. Lidl racks slope issues: #166689, #166690, #166691Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
166685Photo #166685[Image taken 6.4.21] Lidl, James Street, York. These are the design of racks known as Sheffields. These are 100cm apart - the minimum realistic spacing. See also: Lidl racks: #166686, #166687, #166688. Lidl racks slope issues: #166689, #166690, #166691Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
166684Photo #166684[Image taken 6.4.21] Asda, Layerthorpe, York. One Sheffield has been removed as a trial. There is now 115cm between the racks where the space between the remaining Sheffields is around 57cm. I think this is the reason two of the three cycles (the two that are not slimline machines) are on the outsides. See also (improved spacing): #166683 (original spacing) #166148Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
166683Photo #166683[Image taken 6.4.21] The Manager at Asda, Layerthorpe, York has responded quickly to my request for improved spacing between racks. He has already removed one Sheffield between two others. There is now 115cm between the racks. I could access it despite my two front and two rear panniers. There was no other cycle in the space so I could also load/unload the rear panniers with ease. The manage couldn't be persuaded to remove more. He will wait and see how it goes. See also: #166684 (original spacing) #166148Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
166682Photo #166682[Image taken 6.4.21] Clifton Backies, York. These signs (installed 2020) at Clifton Backies (cliftonbackies.org.uk/) are attractive and informative. I'd like to see a version at the cycle-ped-wheelchair entrance to New Earswick village. See also (Clifton Backies board): #166681 (New Earswick): #166666General sign/notice:
Good practice
signs
166681Photo #166681[Image taken 6.4.21] Clifton Backies, York. There are several of these in the Reserve. This one is at the entrance from Sutton Way. See also (Clifton Backies board): #166682 (New Earswick): #166666General sign/notice:
Good practice
signs
166666Photo #166666[Image taken 6.7.19] New Earswick, York. There's signage away from this attractive village. There's nothing to tell you, you are in a place and that this place is New Earswick. There's no clue there are many reasons you might want New Earswick to be your destination. See also: #166664Other:
Infrastructure
general
166664Photo #166664[Image taken 6.7.19] New Earswick, York. New Earswick (www.jrht.org.uk/community/new-earswick-york, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Earswick) is a place. It has an interesting history. It's people-friendly. But there is no, 'Welcome to' sign that announces to people arriving from the cycle-ped route across Bootham Stray (from the Foss Islands cycle path en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Cycle_Route_658, York) you have arrived somewhere. In fact, the signage suggests you are simply passing through, that there's nothing of interest here. I've been lobbying to change this for several years after discovering by accident that there are many reasons for this to be your destination. Or at least a stopping point. The Folk Hall (newearswickfolkhall.com/), the post office, the library, the cafe, the children's play area, the swimming pool, the nature reserve... I'd like to see information boards that include the history and a map like at Clifton Backies (see: #166682). See also: #166666General sign/notice:
Problem
signs
166603Photo #166603[Image taken 2.4.21] The original 'all non-motor users' route which runs through Marygate car park, York. It is alongside the Scarborough-York rail line. The too-tight space is further reduced by the plants that grow through the railings. On the day I took this image I measured a typical branch at 40cm. Nearby was a briar - ie a thorny plant - one tendril of which was even longer. It is still early in the growing season. Based on previous years, the space for people will decrease noticeably. Since last summer, there has been a popup (coned off) covid-19 corridor parallel to the original and between it and the car parking. In November 2020, City of York Council took a decision that when the popup corridor was removed (date to be confirmed), the width of original route would be increased. However, there will be even more pressure on it as the number of users will increase. Some of the increase will result from the lit crossing planned for Bootham specifically to facilitate cycle-ped-hire scooter traffic. Some will follow construction of a slope to replace the existing steps on St Mary's which will mean more people can and will access the route. The reduction in width from plant growth will put even more pressure on the proposed width. (See also: #157644)Obstruction:
Problem
obstructions
166568Photo #166568This is a residential street under constant rat run use, including speeding drivers and lorries.

Also suffers from the number of people using it to park their cars to visit the park - there is a dedicated car park on the other side.
Temporary closure:
Problem
closure
166567Photo #166567Another narrow gate, difficult for all to use.

Not wheelchair accessible.
Track:
Problem
track
166553Photo #166553[Image taken 1.4.21] Tesco Extra, Clifton Moor, York. This toast rack (cycle parking) is well signposted. Alas the 'Toblerone'-designs don't support cycles. As a result many people use the railings around the trolley parks instead. See also: (Tesco): #166550, #166552 (other parts of the site): #161177, #161178, #161179.General sign/notice:
Good practice
signs
166552Photo #166552[Image taken 1.4.21] Perimeter route of one of the Clifton Moor, York retail areas. This one with a Tesco Extra. There is no convenient, comfortable, accessible exit - ie no drop kerb - to the road network for people on cycles other than by lifting your (likely laden with shopping, perhaps also with a child/children on it) cycle up and down this kerb. It is disappointing this hasn't been done as the whole area has been resurfaced and repainted. See also: (Tesco): #166550, #166553; (other parts of the site): #161177, #161178, #161179.Road environment:
Problem
road
166550Photo #166550[Image taken 1.4.21] Clifton Moor, York. The car park and access roads to/from the Tesco (and other outlets) has been resurfaced. The holes just before the crossing (and its access to another retail park, residential areas, pump tracks, NCN65, Rawcliffe Park and Ride, etc) no longer exist. Bliss. See also: (Tesco): #166552, #166553 (other parts of the site): #161177, #161178, #161179.Other:
Infrastructure
general
166547Photo #166547[Image taken 1.4.21] Clifton Moor Gate, York. The gap left for pedestrians is very narrow. There's no room to pass - even at pre-social distancing space requirements. It was tight on laden cycles. I am not certain a wheelchair could make it through easily and comfortably. Ditto a trike/cargo cycle. (Note: I only used the crossing in the direction shown.) See also: #166546Roadworks:
Problem
roadworks
166546Photo #166546[Image taken 1.4.21] Clifton Moor Gate, York. Works are taking place where there is usually a toucan crossing. No provision at all has been provided for people who cycle. Yet this (Rawcliffe/Clifton) area has a standard-setting extensive network of parallel cycle and pedestrian routes separated from the road network. I'm at a loss to understand this. See also: #166547Roadworks:
Problem
roadworks
166545Photo #166545[Image taken 1.4.21] Micklegate, York. Cycle racks? Scooter bays? Or wheely bin storage area? See also: #164327, #164328, #164329Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
166529Photo #166529[Image taken 31.3.21] Hurrah! A No vehicle idling sign. It's at a bus stop on Museum Street, York. Clutter be damned! Let's hope it's the first of very many. And that it leads to attitude and behaviour changes among all drivers, professional and not.General sign/notice:
Good practice
signs
166526Photo #166526[Image taken 21.3.21] At Tanner Row, near junction with Rougier Street, York, the hire scooter bays block access to the information totem. For all related issues and images see: #164846Other:
Infrastructure
general
166525Photo #166525[Image taken 27.2.21] The new Dyson handwashing facilities in York rail station. Do you steer them or wrestle them? Completely overdesigned and inappropriate for a place you get all ages, all levels of education, and people who are short of time. See also: #166524Other:
Problem
general
166524Photo #166524[Image taken 31.3.21] In February 2021, the ladies loos were relocated. The new handwashing facilities (from Dyson) are so unlike taps and dryers there are now posters to show how to use them. (If you need a video there's one on the Dyson website, and prices: www.dyson.co.uk/commercial/hand-dryers/airblade-wash-dry-short) The dryers operate at a typical Dyson volume: very, very loud. The doors to the cubicles are indistinguishable from the surrounds. I struggle to use these facilities. I am afraid people with sight issues, and conditions such as dementia will just be confused to the point of not being able to use them.
A spokesperson for Dementia UK said:
"The issue of Dementia friendly public toilets has been raised and researched in the past with various organisations.
Research evidence shows that dementia can damage the attention system, not just the memory. This means people with the condition are less able to process the information around them, and to filter out things which are irrelevant. This is why the design of public toilets and signage are especially important in making them more accessible to people with dementia.
Where public toilets are provided, poor design and signage are often barriers to independent use, particularly for people living with dementia. Inadequate toilet facilities have distressing consequences. They mean a lower quality of life for people with dementia, and increased levels of anxiety when out and about.
Those affected by dementia have a great need to quickly find, use, and safely exit a public toilet or a toilet within a shop or restaurant. But they face some of the greatest difficulties in doing so.
For those living with dementia, the ability to live a normal life through day to day activities such as shopping or meeting friends in the community is affected. This can lead to social isolation, loneliness and a loss of independence.
It is not just people with dementia who are affected by this situation. Many older adults avoid going about their everyday lives because of the inaccessible nature and lack of publically available toilet facilities.
A... ...small improvements can make a big difference, such as having clear entrance and exit signs. Toilet facilities lacking these can cause distress and embarrassment and a reluctance to use the facility in future.
Common examples include carers having to enter opposite-sex toilets to guide their partners out, or the person going through the wrong door and becoming lost.
A fire exit sign showing someone running with a directional arrow is also easily misunderstood as an exit sign. Similarly, doors that are both a fire exit and the route back to a public area can cause confusion.
Design guidelines for making public toilets more dementia-friendly are already in the public domain. They include, using familiar or automatic flush systems, non-reflective surfaces, good lighting, contrast between doors and surroundings and between the toilet and toilet seat, sinks that do not resemble urinals, well labelled taps and soap dispensers, and the careful placing of mirrors.
Only by raising awareness of this need, will the situation improve. Local authorities, retailers and businesses on the high street, community groups all have a part to play.
Public bodies such as local authorities even have a duty in law to make reasonable adjustments that mean people with conditions such as dementia are able to use their services, including when providing toilets."
See also: #166525, (cycle parking) #165416 (ticket office no cycles sign): #165419. Rawcliffe Bar Park & Ride loos: #167104
Other:
Problem
general
166523Photo #166523[Image taken 31.3.21] ASL on Micklegate, York, corner of George Hudson Street. For several years I've been asking for this ASL to be repainted. Contrast it with #166496. Could it not have been done at the same time? Drivers just don't see it. I stood for three light changes taking the image. Each of the first drivers arriving at the lights continued into the ASL. I asked one, If the cycle box had been painted green would you have stopped before it? He didn't understand the question. I tried a different one: Did you see the cycle symbol on the road where you are now? No.Other:
Infrastructure
general
166522Photo #166522[Image taken 31.3.21] Transporting an awning in a trailer on NCN65 near Rawcliffe Meadows, York. See also wider, longer 'York' cycles: #164845.Bicycle:
Good practice
bicycles
166521Photo #166521[Image taken 31.3.21] Tom's Bakfiets dwarfs his son's Ridgeback, Rowntree Park. See also (Tom): #166520 (Other wider cycles): #164845Bicycle:
Good practice
bicycles
166520Photo #166520[Image taken 16.2.20] Tom and son and coracle returning home after a paddle in a flooded Rowntree Park, York. See also (Tom): #166521 (Other wider cycles): #164845Bicycle:
Good practice
bicycles
166496Photo #166496[Image taken 30.3.21] Micklegate Bar, York. In February 2021, there was no access for people on cycles from Blossom Street or Queen Street. The Bar has reopened and the deep ASL has been repainted. (Bar closed see: #164583.) See also: #166495Road environment:
Good practice
road
166495Photo #166495[Image taken 30.3.21] The gas works completed, Micklegate Bar, York is again open to people on cycles. (Closed Bar with misleading signage see: #164586.) Bar from other side see: #166496Road environment:
Infrastructure
road
166493Photo #166493[Image taken 30.3.21] Station Road, York towards the Minster (top left in photo). Riding this route on the previous day, I was the only vehicle on the road. I was able to smell the flowers. Sadly, that was a first as this route is usually choked with queueing motor vehicles. The next natural 'Welcome to York' will be when the trees, including those not visible on the left, display abundant pink blossom. See also #166492Road environment:
Event
road
166492Photo #166492[Image taken 30.3.21] Station Road, York. Exit the railway station at this time of year and beyond the buses and the clutter, the banks of the city walls opposite are strikingly yellow. They also show up well after dark under the lights illuminating the walls. See also: #166493Road environment:
Event
road
166423Photo #166423[Image taken 29.3.21] Racks in use in Marygate car park, York. After work had finished for the day, much of the building materials and equipment has been removed (presumably used) so is no longer obstructing the entire set of Sheffields. See also: #165767Cycle parking:
Event
cycleparking
166422Photo #166422[Image taken 29.3.21] Metal caging (see: ) makes the left turn into the popup coned off covid-19 corridor through Marygate car park, York even tighter. The route ahead is the original. See also: #157644Obstruction:
Event
obstructions
166421Photo #166421[Image taken 29.3.21] Cyclist who’s ridden from Bootham Terrace, though the rail underpass, entering Marygate car park, York. The metal caging surrounds works for electric charging bays for motor vehicles. See also: #166371Obstruction:
Event
obstructions
166420Photo #166420[Image taken 29.3.21] Underpass between Bootham Terrace and Marygate Lane just metres from the cycle-pedestrian-E/hire-scooter (Tier), wheelchair route through Marygate car park. See also: #157641Track:
Infrastructure
track
166419Photo #166419[Image taken 29.3.21] Location of the cycle signage at Marygate car park, York. See also: #166418Route sign:
Infrastructure
routesigns
166418Photo #166418[Image taken 29.3.21] Signage close to the underpass of the Scarborough rail line shows cycle routes through and destinations beyond Marygate car park, York. See also: #157641Route sign:
Infrastructure
routesigns
166417Photo #166417[Image taken 29.3.21] Metal caging (see: ) makes the left turn into the popup coned-off covid-19 corridor through Marygate car park, York even tighter. See also: #166371Obstruction:
Event
obstructions
166387Photo #166387[Image taken 28.3.21], Marygate car park, York. See also: #166371Obstruction:
Problem
obstructions
166382Photo #166382[Image taken 28.3.21], Marygate car park, York. See also: #166371Obstruction:
Problem
obstructions
166381Photo #166381[Image taken 28.3.21], Marygate car park, York. See also: #166371Other:
Infrastructure
general
166380Photo #166380[Image taken 28.3.21], Marygate car park, York. See also: #166371Obstruction:
Problem
obstructions
166379Photo #166379[Image taken 28.3.21], Marygate car park, York. See also: #166371Obstruction:
Problem
obstructions
166378Photo #166378[Image taken 28.3.21] Marygate car park, York. This family (two adults, a child cycling independently and one on the back of the mother's cycle) had reached this sign #166382. With the route ahead blocked and no safe diversion route signed or provided they threaded their way through the car park to the exit on Marygate Lane #166380. Their exit from the direct route - a coned covid-19 popup corridor #157644 - is usually where the blue sign is just in the background #166371.Obstruction:
Problem
obstructions
166377Photo #166377[Image taken 28.3.21], Marygate car park, York. See also: #166371Obstruction:
Problem
obstructions
166376Photo #166376[Image taken 28.3.21], Marygate car park, York. See also: #166371Obstruction:
Problem
obstructions
166373Photo #166373[Image taken 28.3.21], Marygate car park, York. See also: #166371Obstruction:
Problem
obstructions
166372Photo #166372[Image taken 28.3.21], Marygate car park, York. See also: #166371Obstruction:
Problem
obstructions
166371Photo #166371Update 29.3.21 Today the route was no longer blocked see: #166417. [Image taken 28.3.21] Marygate car park, York. The route to/from the river (and walks) and Scarborough Bridge (wheelchair-accessible since early 2019) was blocked on Saturday 27 and Sunday 28 March 2021. (See: #166372, #166373, #166382). A family (see: #166376) was happy for me to take their photo. They were pleased someone was trying to get the issues caused by the works in the car park addressed.
The problems: There is no signage for cyclists. There are no direction signs for anyone. There is no signed diversion. There is no safe route through the car park.
Details: There is no sign on the Bootham Terrace approach (the other side of the railway underpass). There is just the one sign: ‘Pedestrians’ at the blocked off entrance to the route through the car park. The pavement is narrow. There is no drop kerb (see: #166377.) The parallel ‘carriageway’ is cobbled (see: #166378). The only sign at the other end of that cobbled lane (junction of Frederic Street and Marygate Lane according to Streetview) again just has a Pedestrians sign (see: #166379) The arrow directs people to… where? There’s no assistance for people trying to reach the river, the bridge, the rail station, parts of York you can reach through the station…
There are no signs at the Marygate Lane entrance to the car park – neither directions nor a safe, protected route through (see: #166380), nor further in (see: #166387) There are no signs of any kind – no warning the route is closed nor diversions nor showing a safe/protected route through at the other end of the original walkway/coned covid corridor (see: #166381)
The original route (next to and parallel to the rail line) is used by many people including sight impaired people. That narrow thoroughfare plus the parallel coned popup covid-19 corridor is also used by pedestrians, people on cycles, human-propelled scooters... some of whom are pupils going to/from schools including St Peter’s and Bootham independently or accompanied; dog walkers, runners, joggers, commuters. Users are all ages, all levels of fitness, and all types of disability including learning. See: Concrete (other?) machinery in operation next to the racks see: #166267. For Tier scooters see: #164663. Popup covid corridor see: #157644
Obstruction:
Problem
obstructions
166370Photo #166370[Image taken 28.3.21] Between 14.30 and 15.30, two residents counted people on Terry Avenue, York on a blustery but dry Sunday. The reason was to get a benchline ahead of the closure of the route for flood works at Clementhorpe (see also: #164634).
The ‘count line’ was the full width of the space between the river and the fencing (a line marked by the dog waste bin and the lifebuoy in the photo) close to the entrance to Rowntree Park. The day and date chosen because it was the Sunday of the final weekend before the route was due to close and the time was because we were free for that hour.
Rowntree Park was open. The children’s playing areas were open. The tennis and basketball courts were closed. The skate park was full. I think it was supposed to be closed but saw youngsters climbing over railings.
Note on numbers: There are several entrances to/exits from Rowntree Park including two on Terry Ave. People could miss the count line because they entered or exited from the pedestrian entrance on Terry Ave to the right of our count line. (We could see these people but not count them.) We could not see and not count people using other entry/exit points from/to Terry Ave, for example those entering through Butcher Terrace, who moved through the park and exited on Terry Ave via the car park, and vice versa. Therefore there were more people cycling, scooting or walking on Terry Ave than our count shows.
Results: 419 people in 60 minutes
4 people in wheelchairs (all accompanied and pushed);
77 people cycling (including one infant in a child seat)
338 people on foot or child scooters
2 Tier scooter users
Note: When the Council did their count in 2019, Tier scooters had not yet arrived in the city.
During lockdown the diversity of users reduced. I still see very few people who are clearly older and people with mobility issues, for example using walking aids and in wheelchairs, compared with pre-covid use.
Covid notes: On the day the count was done: The link from the BBC site for York (www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-54373904) said:
You should stay at home except for a limited number of reasons - these include shopping for necessities, going to work (if you cannot do so from home), volunteering, seeking medical assistance, or avoiding domestic abuse.
• If you are clinically extremely vulnerable you should only go out for medical appointments, exercise or if it is essential. You should not attend work.
• You may exercise outdoors on your own, with one other person, or with your household or support bubble. You should stay in your local area.
• You may socialise outdoors with one other person not in your household.
• You should stay two metres apart from anyone not in your household, or one metre with precautions (such as a face covering).
• Some support groups can continue with up to 15 participants - but they must not take place in a private home.
• The police can fine you up to £10,000 for taking part in illegal gatherings.
On the day of counting, the BBC reported that more than 29m people had received at least one dose of the vaccination (www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-55274833).
(See also proposed cyclist diversion route: #164095)
Other:
Event
general
166369Photo #166369[Image taken 28.3.21] Rowntree Park, York. The two adult cycles have a lock around them. The two child cycles are not locked. Families need space to be able to put their cycles together. I believe 120cm should be the standard space between racks to enable practical, convenient use. (See also: #166368)Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
166368Photo #166368[Image taken 28.3.21] Rowntree Park, York. Adult cycle with child seat, plus child bike sharing one lock. Families share locks and therefore need space to be able to put their cycles together. 100cm spacing between the Sheffields enables the family to share a lock but the gap is not sufficient for another person to use the opposite rack. I believe 120cm should be the norm to enable practical, convenient use. (See also 120cm: #167015, Family group: #166369)Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
166277Photo #166277[Image taken 26.3.21] Rowntree Park, York. Transporting heavy, bulky loads such as bookshelves is possible with a bike and trailer. In this case, the owner was pushing her cycle. For a long rig being cycled see: #164539. For other longer, wider 'York' cycles see: #164845Other:
Infrastructure
general
166276Photo #166276[Image taken 23.3.21] Outside the central library in, York 3 typical wider cycles and therefore needing wider-spaced Sheffields (as available at this location) due to the permanently attached luggage: (l) rack with box, (c & r) rack with panniers. See also: #164845, #165594, #165639Bicycle:
Good practice
bicycles
166271Photo #166271[Image taken: 26.3.21] Pond Garth, Palmer Street on the Hungate development, York. A family's cycles stored on a balcony. There is extensive cycle parking under the buildings. Is it simply too time-consuming to have to access the garages and the cages within them each time you want to use your bike? [Hoardings in the Hungate see also: #165205]Cycle parking:
Infrastructure
cycleparking

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